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  • Metal…amazing and valuable!

    Metal…..one the most valuable and overlooked resources on the planet.  This amazing resource has been around since medieval times and is used by each and every one of us in some form every day.  Metal is used to make cookware, utensils, aplliances, bed frames, alarm clocks, curling irons, lamsps, vehicles, boats, planes, trains, stoves, overns, refrdgerators, dishwashers, washers, dryers,  It is computers, phones, televisions, radios,  and anything else with wires of some sort in it.  Toys and sporting goods are often made with metal.  Take a good long look around your home and you will be able to identify numeous forms of metal.

     

    How often have you used metal today?picture of what semi red brass might look like

     

    It is a scientific that 75% of all the elements in the Periodic Table are classified as metals.  Non-ferrous metals contain no iron and are not magnetic. Brass, aluminum, copper, bronze and lead are among the metals in this group.  Gold and silver are also part of this group, but usually you would take those metals to a jeweller.    Ferrous metals contain an appreciable percentage of iron and the addition of carbon and other substances creates steel.

    Up to the Medieval era of the Middle Ages it was believed that there were only seven metals which are referred to as the ‘Metals of Antiquity’. The ancient ‘Metals of Antiquity’ are as follows; Gold (6000BC), , Copper (9000BC), Silver (4000BC), Lead (6400BC), Tin (3000BC), Iron (1500BC), Mercury )1500BC)

     

    Metal deposits are non-renewable resources that will run out if exploited at the present rate

     

    Metal deposits are non-renewable resources that will run out if exploited at the present rate.  Reserves of copper are still sizeable but will not be able to sustain present rates of consumption.  It is cheaper to recycle steel than to mine iron ore and manipulate it through the production process to form new steel. Steel does not lose any of its inherent physical properties during the recycling process, and has drastically reduced energy and material requirements compared with refinement from iron ore.  The ability to make full use of ferrous scrap–the product of earlier industrial production-makes steel environmentally attractive and reduces the burden on the world’s resources in meeting the growing and innovative uses for steel around the world.  An aluminum can has no limit to the number of times it can be recycled.

     

    The increasing demand for metals in the course of the last century, putting permanent pressure on natural resources, has revealed that metals are a priority area for decoupling economic growth from resource use and environmental degradation.  7 million metric tons of steel recycled in 2010.  More steel is recycled, by weight, each year in Canada than aluminum, paper and glass combined.   A steel mill using recycled scrap reduces water pollution, air pollution, and mining waste by about 70 percent.

    Given the fact that we have become accutoned to using so much metal, it is time for us a a society to begin thinking about th future.  It will be a harsh reality when the day comes that we no longer have any metal to rely on!

    When you throw away an aluminum can you waste as much energy as if you’d filled the can half full of gasoline and poured it into the ground.